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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

Cornell University. New York Invasive Species Research Institute.

Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.

Conservation Biology Institute; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Much of the content presented here is taken from A Guide to Climate Change Adaptation for Conservation: Resources and Tools for Climate Smart Management of Florida's Fish and Wildlife Species and Their Habitats (PDF | 6.97 MB) (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 2016) and the Climate Change Impacts on Florida's Biodiversity and Ecology (4.12 MB) chapter in "Florida’s Climate: Changes, Variations and Impacts (Florida Climate Institute, 2017)."

Miami-Dade County (Florida); DOD. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; DOI. National Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; South Florida Water Management District.

Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program.
TexasInvasives.org.
The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.

Cornell University. New York Invasive Species Research Institute.

A cozy campfire for summer days, a warm fireplace for winter evenings– the use of firewood is an "established cultural norm". However, moving firewood from place to place can have devastating consequences, as it can spread forest pests that decimate forests to collectively cost an estimated $4.2 – $14.4 billion per year. In order to better address the problem of people moving firewood and vectoring forest pests, Solano and colleagues examined trends and gaps in the existing literature on firewood and human-mediated forest pest movement in North America. The existing literature demonstrates the risk of firewood movement, but fails to address the level of awareness the public has on such risks, or the level of effectiveness of firewood regulations to prevent forest pest spread.

Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council; Orange County Government; University of South Florida.

FLIP (Florida Invasive Plants) is designed to be a mobile field guide that can be accessed by a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other device with internet browser capability. Developed in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), FLIP currently contains 20 plants: 19 of the 2011 Category I invasive species and one of the 2011 Category II invasive species, as designated by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).
Florida Invasive Species Partnership.

Florida Invasive Species Partnership.

This online tool is intended to connect Florida landowners and land managers with financial and technical support. Select your county name, target species and other information to retrieve a list of programs. This resource is regularly updated to provide current opportunities and contacts.

Lake Champlain Basin Program.

TexasInvasives.org.

Zebra mussels are a small, destructive invasive species that can spread across Texas by hitching a ride on boats and trailers. Zebra mussels can cause tremendous environmental and economic damage - hurting aquatic life, damaging your boat, hindering water recreation and even threatening your water supply. In the state's ongoing effort to combat the spread of invasive zebra mussels, new rules effective July 1, 2014 require that all boats operating on public fresh water anywhere in Texas be drained after use.

University of Idaho.

Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

IveGot1 is more than just an app, it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for Florida that includes the app, a website with direct access to invasive species reporting and a hotline 1-888-IVEGOT1 for instant reports of live animals. By reporting sightings of invasive animals and plants, Florida agencies can better assess the extent of the infestations and hopefully eradicate new infestations before they become huge problems. The goal of IveGot1 is to make identification and reporting easy and efficient as possible.

Texas State University System.
Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

Western New York Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management.