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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

It has been a wild year with lots of challenges, but MAISRC is still here and working as hard as ever to develop research-based solutions to reduce the impacts of aquatic invasive species in Minnesota. MAISRC hopes the research highlights included in the report will surprise, inspire, and give you hope.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

This ID book contains tips for identifying a number of aquatic invasive species (AIS) that are considered high-risk to Minnesota waters, as well as some common native lookalike species. The 3rd Edition of the guide was released in 2021and includes information for aquatic and wetland plants, invertebrates, and fish. The ID book can be accessed by downloading a printable version, or you can purchase it through the University of Minnesota Bookstore, or you will receive a copy if you become an AIS Detector.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service.

See also: Weed Management Publications for more resources
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Exotic Species Program.
Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species
Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

University of Minnesota.
IPM of Midwest Landscapes is available for educating growers, landscapers, managers, and consumers in the principles of IPM and its application to managing the over 150 common insect species in Midwest landscapes.

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Beginning Monday, Oct. 25, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will lead a second intensive invasive carp removal effort in Pool 8 of the Mississippi River near La Crosse, Wis. Thirty-four silver carp were captured in Pool 8 during the first interagency carp removal operation in April. The innovative Modified Unified Method (MUM) combines netting and herding techniques to drive and concentrate invasive carp from a large area of water into a small zone for removal. The DNR is conducting this work in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Anglers are reminded that invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately. Call 651-587-2781 or email invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest DNR fisheries office or arrange for it to be picked up by a DNR official.

Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. Montana Invasive Species Council.

The Montana and Washington invasive species councils have joined forces to stop wild pigs from crossing borders. The two councils issued a report with recommendations and best management practices aimed at helping federal, state, provincial and local landowners manage wild pigs in the western United States and Canada. "Wild pig populations are expanding in the western provinces of Canada and in the United States." said Stephanie Criswell, coordinator of the Montana Invasive Species Council. "We are at a unique point in time where we can work together to prevent Canadian wild pigs from spreading across borders into unaffected states like Montana."

In early 2020, the two invasive species councils convened a working group of more than 40 federal, state and Canadian feral swine experts to discuss challenges and opportunities to prevent feral swine along interstate and international borders. Finalized this month, the report includes 22 recommendations that address five strategic areas of feral swine management. Recommendations include standardizing communications to the public, expanding monitoring networks by partnering with non-traditional organizations such as hunting groups, and formalizing notification protocols for reports that will be shared between state and provincial authorities along the international border. The complete report can be found at misc.mt.gov.

Washington State University. College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences.

A parasitoid wasp that is the natural enemy of a fly known as the spotted-wing drosophila could be a good friend to growers. Washington State University researchers recently confirmed the discovery of the potentially beneficial wasp in the United States for the first time. The drosophila flies cause major damage to several Washington crops, especially sweet cherries and berries. The wasp, which lays its eggs in the flies, could be a means of controlling their spread.