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Invasive Species Resources

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Oregon Department of Agriculture. Plant Division. Noxious Weed Control.

See also: Oregon Noxious Weed Profiles for more species

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
Clemson University Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).
Oregon State University. Extension Service.
This concise publication gives useful information for homeowners, master gardeners, and professional landscapers about the boxwood blight disease: its symptoms, sanitation measures when it is discovered on a property, and preventive measures.
Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Weed Management Publications for more resources
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Woody Ornamentals for more fact sheets.
South Carolina Forestry Commission.
The emerald ash borer, a beetle pest that has devastated ash trees throughout the eastern United States, was officially detected in Greenville, Oconee and Spartanburg counties in August 2017. According to a Clemson University press release, the beetles were found Aug. 3 during a routine check of Emerald Ash Borer traps and confirmed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In response to the discovery of EAB in the Upstate, the State Crop Pest Commission likely will establish a quarantine area involving at least the three affected counties; it is also possible the quarantine could be expanded to additional counties or even the entire state.
Kansas Department of Agriculture.
Since the emerald ash borer's initial introduction into the United States, it has been spread to many areas of the country by campers and homeowners who unknowingly moved infested firewood to uninfested areas where the beetles emerged and infested new ash trees. You can help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer into Kansas by not moving firewood across county lines. When buying wood for your home, buy only locally grown and harvested firewood. When camping, buy your firewood near your destination and burn all that you bring. If you suspect emerald ash borer on your property please call 785-564-6698 or e-mail your name, address, phone number and pictures of the suspect tree to ppwc@kda.ks.gov.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.