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Invasive Species Resources

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Kansas Native Plant Society.
Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council.
South Carolina Native Plant Society.
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Southeast Regional Taxonomic Center.
Rhode Island Natural History Survey.
Rhode Island Natural History Survey.

Clemson University. Regulatory Services.

Clemson University (South Carolina). Regulatory Services.

Clemson University. Regulatory Services.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

Clemson University. Regulatory Services. Invasive Species Program.

The Clemson University Invasive Species Program will soon be recruiting middle school aged youth to help with the early detection of invasive species in South Carolina! Families, school groups, camps and other organizations can register for the Junior Invasive Inspectors Program. Adult leaders will be given curriculum written for teaching children ages 9-13 about general invasive species awareness, understanding latitude and longitude, recognizing targeted forest pests and symptoms of decline in trees.

Kansas State University. Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.
Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.
Lower Platte Weed Management Area.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Agriculture.

Nebraska Department of Agriculture.

In an effort to slow the spread of the emerald ash borer (EAB), the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA), is adding three more counties to an existing quarantine on ash tree products. Otoe, Lancaster and Saunders join the counties of Douglas, Sarpy, Cass, Washington and Dodge, for a total of eight Nebraska counties regulated under the Nebraska EAB Quarantine. The revisions to the quarantine went into effect Nov. 1, 2018. For more information, see NDA's Emerald Ash Borer page.