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Invasive Species Resources

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Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Alabama Invasive Plant Council.
Alberta Invasive Species Council.
See also: Invasive Plant Mapping with EDDMapS Alberta
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.
This guide contains a collection of hands-on activities that are easy for teachers to use in the classroom and in the schoolyard. The curriculum is designed for kindergarten through 12th grade and most activities are tied to the Georgia Performance Standards. The guide is available to all formal and non-formal educators online at www.gaeppc.org and through workshops offered in the metro-Atlanta area. Classroom teachers, park naturalists, environmental education specialists, and others can adapt these activities to fit easily into their programs.
Iowa Great Lakes Water Safety Council.
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
The Arizona Invasive Species Advisory Council was created in April 2005 by Governor Napolitano to address the challenges that invasive species pose for the state’s natural areas and wildlife.
Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!
Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force.

California Invasive Plant Council.

California Invasive Plant Council.
California Invasive Plant Council.
This interactive database contains information on the plants currently included in the Cal-IPC Invasive Plant Inventory. The Inventory categorizes plants as High, Moderate, or Limited, reflecting the level of each species' negative ecological impact in California. Includes options to search for species by region and by habitat type. The database provides a better view of information on each species and allows users to download the entire Inventory as a spreadsheet.
California Oak Mortality Task Force.
See also: COMTF Newsletter
California Invasive Plant Council.
CalWeedMapper is a new Web site for mapping invasive plant spread and planning regional management. Users generate a report for their region that synthesizes information into three types of strategic opportunities: surveillance, eradication and containment. Land managers can use these reports to prioritize their invasive plant management, to coordinate at the landscape level (county or larger) and to justify funding requests. For some species, CalWeedMapper also provides maps of suitable range that show where a plant might be able to grow in the future. The system was developed by the California Invasive Plant Council and is designed to stay current by allowing users to edit data.
Carolinas Beach Vitex Task Force.
Australian Invasive Species Council.
Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.
  • Don't Let it Loose! Be a responsible pet owner.
  • Commit to be PlantWise! Choose non-invasive alternatives for your garden.
  • Clean, Drain, and Dry your boat and equipment.
Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.