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Invasive Species Resources

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Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection.
Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Polk County Department of Land and Water Resources (Wisconsin).

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
City of Chicago. Department of Environment.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Illinois Department of Public Health. Environmental Health.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Georgia Forestry Commission.
Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.
Georgia Forestry Commission.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Illinois Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Environmental Programs. Division of Natural Resources.
Native to Asia, the Emerald Ash Borer is an exotic beetle that was unknown in North America until June 2002 when it was discovered as the cause for the decline of many ash trees in southeast Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It has since been found in several states from the east coast spanning across the midwest and in June 2006, we discovered that it had taken up residence in Illinois.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Invaders of the Forest is an educators' guide to invasive plants of Wisconsin forests. The guide provides classroom and field activities for formal and non-formal educators working with kindergarten through adult audiences. Lessons are correlated to Wisconsin's academic standards.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.