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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Natural Areas Program.

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.
Illinios-Indiana College Sea Grant Program.
To prepare students to be responsible decision-makers and future leaders, IISG has developed education programs that engage students in experiential practices to promote a sustainable society.
University of Georgia. Cooperative Extension.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

New Jersey Department of Agriculture.

University of Illinois Extension.

Illinois Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Environmental Programs. Division of Natural Resources.
Native to Asia, the Emerald Ash Borer is an exotic beetle that was unknown in North America until June 2002 when it was discovered as the cause for the decline of many ash trees in southeast Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It has since been found in several states from the east coast spanning across the midwest and in June 2006, we discovered that it had taken up residence in Illinois.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
The emerald ash borer is a federally regulated pest, which means its detection will trigger specific regulations that are designed to help prevent its man assisted spread. The USDA, GA Dept. of Agriculture and GA Forestry Commission have been working together to ensure that the regulations minimally impact businesses but at the same time, will limit the likelihood emerald ash borer will be moved in ash nursery stock, or in logs, mulch, firewood, and other similar items.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is one of the most serious invasive species threatening our ash resources and forests. All species of ash that grow in Maine are susceptible to injury and death by the emerald ash borer. As of September 2018, EAB has been found in Aroostook Co. (Madawaska, Frenchville, and Grand Isle), and York Co. (Acton and Lebanon), ME. If you suspect emerald ash borer, please report it online, or call: 207-287-3891.

DOI. National Park Service.

Georgia Forestry Commission.
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

Illinois Department of Agriculture.

University of Illinois. Extension.

Morton Arboretum (Illinois).
Morton Arboretum (Illinois).