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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Georgia. Extension.

Bulletin 1290
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Auburn University (Alabama). College of Agriculture. Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology.
Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Alabama Invasive Plant Council.
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.
This guide contains a collection of hands-on activities that are easy for teachers to use in the classroom and in the schoolyard. The curriculum is designed for kindergarten through 12th grade and most activities are tied to the Georgia Performance Standards. The guide is available to all formal and non-formal educators online at www.gaeppc.org and through workshops offered in the metro-Atlanta area. Classroom teachers, park naturalists, environmental education specialists, and others can adapt these activities to fit easily into their programs.
Georgia Department of Agriculture.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has analyzed the potential environmental effects of establishing an integrated management strategy to control cogongrass in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. The draft environmental assessment is now available for comment. Cogongrass is an invasive exotic grass found on public and private property, along roadways, in forests, and on farmland. This federally regulated noxious weed grows rapidly, reducing forest productivity, harming wildlife habitat and ecosystems, and encroaching on pastures and hayfields. Because of cogongrass' impact on agriculture and forest industries, Congress has given APHIS funding to partner with Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina to control the spread of this weed. APHIS is proposing is an integrated management strategy that uses preventive, cultural, mechanical, biological, and chemical methods to control cogongrass in key areas of its distribution. APHIS invites the public to review and comment on this environmental assessment by April 1, 2020.

Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission.

DOC. NOAA. National Marine Fisheries Service. West Coast Region.

Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

University of Maryland. Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Have a plant or pest question? Questions from Maryland and the District of Columbia are answered by Home and Garden Information Center’s Certified Professional Horticulturists. If you are located outside of these areas, you will be asked to enter your state and county. Your question will be forwarded to the appropriate extension expert.
eXtension.

eXtension is an educational partnership of more than 70 universities to help you improve your life every day with access to objective, research-based information and educational opportunities. Categories include integrated pest management and fire ants. Requires free registration.
See also: Use the One Search service to search the resources provided by your Cooperative Extension Service using a Google Custom Search Engine that includes many of the Cooperative Extension web sites provided by your Land-Grant institutions.

Tennessee Valley Authority.
Last year, the TVA found water hyacinth in a slough near Scottsboro. TVA quickly partnered with the State of Alabama, bringing experts from both sides to start addressing the invasive water weed. Water hyacinth is bad news for Guntersville and other great fisheries in the Tennessee Valley. The plant can quickly outcompete other beneficial plants, often creating biological wastelands. Hartis and his team are asking the public to be on the lookout for hyacinth this summer. “If you see a [hyacinth] plant, pull it out of the water immediately and put it in the trash. We don’t want plants to float to a new area and establish a new colony.” If you find a large area of hyacinth, please report it to TVA's Public Land Information Center at (800) 882-5263 (between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Eastern).
Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
University of Georgia. Bugwood Network.
Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries.
A plant disease that presents a serious threat to the U.S. citrus industry has been detected in Alabama. Federal and state plant health officials have confirmed the identification of citrus greening (CG), also known as Huanglongbing or HLB, which is caused by the bacterial pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This is the first confirmation of citrus greening in Alabama despite biannual surveys for the pathogen by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI).