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Invasive Species Resources

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Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.

National Conference of State Legislatures.
National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) tracks environment and natural resources legislation to bring you up-to-date, real-time information on bills (from 2015) that have been introduced in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Database provides search options by state (or territory), topic, keyword, year, status or primary sponsor. Topics include: Wildlife-Invasive Species and Wildlife-Pollinators.
Oklahoma Administrative Code.

Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.

Michigan's Invasive Species Program.
If your leisure-time plans include boating or fishing in Michigan, recent changes in Michigan’s Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act (NREPA) may affect you. Beginning March 21, watercraft users in the state are required to take steps to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. Also, anyone fishing with live or cut bait or practicing catch-and-release fishing will need to take precautions to limit the movement of invasive species and fish diseases.

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Consumer Protection Services.

Tennessee Rules and Regulations.
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.