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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Georgia. Cooperative Extension.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
The emerald ash borer is a federally regulated pest, which means its detection will trigger specific regulations that are designed to help prevent its man assisted spread. The USDA, GA Dept. of Agriculture and GA Forestry Commission have been working together to ensure that the regulations minimally impact businesses but at the same time, will limit the likelihood emerald ash borer will be moved in ash nursery stock, or in logs, mulch, firewood, and other similar items.
University of Tennessee. Institute of Agriculture.
National Conference of State Legislatures.
National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) tracks environment and natural resources legislation to bring you up-to-date, real-time information on bills (from 2015) that have been introduced in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Database provides search options by state (or territory), topic, keyword, year, status or primary sponsor. Topics include: Wildlife-Invasive Species and Wildlife-Pollinators.

DOI. National Park Service.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management.
Tennessee State Government.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
Quagga mussel larvae, or veligers, were first confirmed in Lake Powell in late 2012 after routine water monitoring tests discovered mussel DNA in water samples taken from the vicinity of Antelope Point and the Glen Canyon Dam. As of early 2016, thousands of adult quagga mussels have been found in Lake Powell, attached to canyon walls, the Glen Canyon Dam, boats, and other underwater structures, especially in the southern portions of the lake. It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures.
University of Guam. College of Natural and Applied Sciences. Research and Extension.

DHHS. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

Provides links and resources for State Health Departments, many of which have information about Zika virus and West Nile virus with specific state information.

University of Georgia. Extension.

Circular 868.

Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
University of Tennessee Extension.
Tennessee State Government.