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Invasive Species Resources

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Georgia Department of Agriculture.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations. See also: Resources for Plant Diseases for more publications
DOI. NPS. Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forestry, Parks, and Recreation.
Firewood is widely recognized as a major source of non-native forest insect and disease infestations. A rule governing the importation of untreated firewood into Vermont went into effect on May 1, 2016. Visitors to Vermont State Parks, Vermont State Forests, and the Green Mountain National Forest may only bring firewood originating from Vermont or that is heat treated and in its original, labeled package. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer within Vermont, ash firewood that has not been heat treated should not be moved outside of the Emerald Ash Borer Infested Area in Vermont.
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant and Pest Services.
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant and Pest Services.
University of Kentucky. Entomology.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) just announced the detection of a new invasive insect pest in Virginia. In early January, VDACS inspectors discovered the Spotted Lanternfly (SLF), Lycorma delicatula, at a stone yard in Frederick County near Winchester. The Spotted Lanternfly is native to China, India and Vietnam, and prior to the January detection, was not known to occur in Virginia. Both SLF egg masses and dead adults were detected at the Winchester site.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture. Ellington Agricultural Center.
University of Tennessee. Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.
University of Georgia. College of Veterinary Medicine. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study.

Arlington Department of Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources (Virginia).

Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Environmental Conservation. Watershed Management Division.
Early detection is vital to protecting Vermont's water bodies from harmful invasive plants and animals. With more than 800 lakes and ponds throughout the state, volunteers play a key role in our surveying efforts. Vermont Invasive Patrollers (VIPs) monitor water bodies for new introductions of invasive species and report their findings to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

Lake Champlain Basin Program.