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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Vermont. Forest Pathology.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
University of Georgia. Cooperative Extension.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
The emerald ash borer is a federally regulated pest, which means its detection will trigger specific regulations that are designed to help prevent its man assisted spread. The USDA, GA Dept. of Agriculture and GA Forestry Commission have been working together to ensure that the regulations minimally impact businesses but at the same time, will limit the likelihood emerald ash borer will be moved in ash nursery stock, or in logs, mulch, firewood, and other similar items.

DOI. National Park Service.

University of Georgia. Extension.

Circular 868.

New Mexico Department of Agriculture.
The Director of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture has selected the following plant species to be targeted as noxious weeds for control or eradication pursuant to the Noxious Weed Management Act of 1998 (updated from 2009). This list does not include every plant species with the potential to negatively affect the state's environment or economy.
See also: Noxious Weed Information for more resources.
New Mexico Game & Fish.
New rules to combat the spread of aquatic invasive species in New Mexico went into effect July 11, 2017. Changes include:

  • Watercraft owners are required to stop at an inspection station whenever one is set up and in operation.
  • Mandatory inspection and, if necessary, decontamination is required of all out-of-state registered watercraft or watercraft re-entering the state of New Mexico.
  • All boaters are required to "pull the plug" and completely drain watercraft when transporting on a New Mexico roadway.
New Mexico State University. College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences.
New Mexico State University. Library Digital Collections.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
University of Georgia. College of Veterinary Medicine. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study.
University of Georgia. BugwoodWiki.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation.
As part of the ongoing response to the recent discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) within the state, Vermont has joined the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s 31-state quarantine boundary. The quarantine will help reduce the movement of infested ash wood to un-infested regions outside of Vermont's borders. Ash wood may not be moved from Vermont to Maine, Rhode Island, or 7 counties in New Hampshire because the pest has not been identified in these states and counties. Vermont is also developing a series of slow-the-spread recommendations, initially including recommendations for handling logs, firewood, and other ash materials. To learn more about these recommendations, to see a map indicating where EAB is known to occur in Vermont, and to report suspected invasive species like EAB, visit vtinvasives.org