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Invasive Species Resources

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California Department of Fish and Wildlife.
The goals of the California Invasive Species Action Week (CISAW) are to increase public awareness of invasive species issues and promote public participation in the fight against California's invasive species and their impacts on our natural resources.

Prevention is the most effective strategy in managing invasive species. However, hundreds of invasive plants and animals have already established in California and are rapidly spreading each year. These invaders are negatively impacting our waters, our native plants and animals (some of them rare, threatened, or endangered), our agriculture, our health, our economy, and our favorite recreational places. Help us celebrate California's Invasive Species Action Week, and more importantly, help stop the spread of invasive species, by volunteering to take action.
California Department of Health Services; California Department of Food and Agriculture; Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California; California Vectorborne Disease Surveillance System.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
USDA. Blog.
Key partners and contributors in Napa County, California, recently celebrated and recognized the critical safeguarding accomplishment achieved together, of eradicating the invasive European grapevine moth (EGVM) from the U.S. The keys to success were early detection, our rapid response, and a strong collaboration between federal, state and local officials, growers, university scientists and extension services. Such partnerships remain critical to our ability to safeguard agriculture and facilitate safe trade.
University of California - Berkeley. Cooperative Extension; USDA. Forest Service.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri
California Department of Food and Agriculture. Plant Health and Pest Prevention Services Division.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Office of Spill Prevention and Response.
University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.

University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.

Marin Agricultural Land Trust (California).
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) announced today that a single dead specimen of the invasive pest known as spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was reported and confirmed at a private residence in Boston. As a result, MDAR is urging the public to check for signs of spotted lanternfly adults in any potted plants that they may have received over the holiday season and to report any potential sightings of this pest on MDAR's online reporting form by taking photographs and collecting a specimen if possible. Residents should look for large, gray insects, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings.
University of Georgia. College of Veterinary Medicine. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.