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Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 15 of 15

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USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.
Select the non-indigenous forest pest to view maps depicting state and county distribution. Produced by: USDA, FS, Forest Health Protection, and its partners.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.

USDA. FS. Forest Health Protection. Southern Region.

View the updated regional infestation map for Laurel Wilt Disease (for initial detection in May 2002. Map is updated periodically (USDA,FS - Forest & Grassland Health).

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

DOI. FWS. Midwest Region.
USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.
Provides distribution maps and predicted future range expansion.
Lake Stewards of Maine.
Special Note: Formerly known as the Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

Maine Forest Service. Winter moth was first recorded in Nova Scotia in the 1930s and then in the Pacific Northwest in the 1970's. It showed up in eastern Massachusetts in the early 2000's and has since spread into coastal Maine from Kittery to Bar Harbor. Fill out the Winter Moth Survey to help us gather information about the distribution of these moths across Maine. The results will be used to help with biological control development and other research.
University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

The Southeast Early Detection Network (SEEDN) app brings the power of Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) to your smartphone. Now you can submit invasive species observations directly with your smartphone from the field. These reports are uploaded to EDDMapS and e-mailed directly to local and state verifiers for review. SEEDN is more than just a smartphone app; it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for the Southeastern United States that includes the app and the EDDMapS website.

North Central Soybean Research Program. Soybean Research and Information Initiative.

Scroll and select Distribution to view known distribution of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, in counties in the United States and Canada in selected years from 1957 to 2014.

University of Georgia. College of Veterinary Medicine. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study.
Gulf of Maine Research Institute.
Vital Signs is a statewide effort to address invasive species. Our collective research focus is on locating invasive species and documenting the native species and habitats vulnerable to invasions. Together we are using scientific tools and habits of mind to look for native and invasive species in local habitats. We are sharing what we find and do not find online. We are contributing to a greater understanding of and connection to our shared environment.