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Invasive Species Resources

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Washington Native Plant Society.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
Pacific Biodiversity Institute (Washington).
Georgia Department of Agriculture.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
AIS-HACCP is a self-inspection system for reducing the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species through aquaculture, hatchery, scientific, natural resource, and baitfish harvesting activities. This adaptable way to protect waterways from unwanted species was derived from HACCP methods required for the seafood industry and builds on Sea Grant’s success in assisting industry compliance.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

New Mexico Department of Game & Fish.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Exotic Species Program.
Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

DOI. NPS. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
Quagga mussel larvae, or veligers, were first confirmed in Lake Powell in late 2012 after routine water monitoring tests discovered mussel DNA in water samples taken from the vicinity of Antelope Point and the Glen Canyon Dam. As of early 2016, thousands of adult quagga mussels have been found in Lake Powell, attached to canyon walls, the Glen Canyon Dam, boats, and other underwater structures, especially in the southern portions of the lake. It is crucial to keep the mussels from moving from Lake Powell to other lakes and rivers. Utah and Arizona state laws require you to clean, drain, and dry your boat when leaving Lake Powell using self-decontamination procedures.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

Washington Sea Grant.
Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species

Minnesota Invasive Species Advisory Council.

One of the keys to a rapid response to invasive species is the early identification of new occurrences. Please help report occurrences of invasive species in Minnesota. To report suspicious pest species arriving on plants or articles from foreign countries or other states, please contact the MDA's Arrest the Pest. To report invasive aquatic plants or wild animals, please contact the DNR Invasive Species Program at: 651-259-5100 (metro) or 1-888-646-6367.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Washington State University Extension.

University of Minnesota. Forest Resources Extension. My Minnesota Woods.