An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 20 of 34

Search Help
Georgia Department of Agriculture.
New Mexico Department of Game & Fish.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is one of the most serious invasive species threatening our ash resources and forests. All species of ash that grow in Maine are susceptible to injury and death by the emerald ash borer. As of September 2018, EAB has been found in Aroostook Co. (Madawaska, Frenchville, and Grand Isle), and York Co. (Acton and Lebanon), ME. If you suspect emerald ash borer, please report it online, or call: 207-287-3891.

Michigan State University. Integrated Pest Management Program.
Provides information about exotic plant pests with the highest potential to enter Michigan. These likely invaders are presented in fact sheets with descriptions of their biology and how to identify them. Risk maps forecast locations where invasives are likely to establish.

Michigan State University. Integrated Pest Management Program.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

Michigan State University.

Michigan Department of Natural Resource; Michigan State University Extension. Michigan Natural Features Inventory.
See also: Best Control Practice Guides for more guides

Michigan Department of Natural Resource; Michigan State University Extension. Michigan Natural Features Inventory.

See also: Best Control Practice Guides for more guides

Michigan Department of Natural Resource; Michigan State University Extension. Michigan Natural Features Inventory.
See also: Best Control Practice Guides for more guides

Michigan Department of Natural Resource; Michigan State University Extension. Michigan Natural Features Inventory.

See also: Best Control Practice Guides for more guides

Michigan Department of Natural Resource; Michigan State University Extension. Michigan Natural Features Inventory.
See also: Best Control Practice Guides for more guides
Michigan Department of Natural Resource; Michigan State University Extension. Michigan Natural Features Inventory.
See also: Best Control Practice Guides for more guides

Michigan Department of Natural Resource; Michigan State University Extension. Michigan Natural Features Inventory.

See also: Best Control Practice Guides for more guides

Michigan Department of Natural Resource; Michigan State University Extension. Michigan Natural Features Inventory.
See also: Best Control Practice Guides for more guides
Lake Stewards of Maine.
Special Note: Formerly known as the Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program.

Michigan State University. Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: IPM Scouting in Woody Landscape Plants for more pests and diseases (Publication E2839)

Michigan State University. Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: IPM Scouting in Woody Landscape Plants for more pests and diseases