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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

See also: VHS research

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
AIS-HACCP is a self-inspection system for reducing the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species through aquaculture, hatchery, scientific, natural resource, and baitfish harvesting activities. This adaptable way to protect waterways from unwanted species was derived from HACCP methods required for the seafood industry and builds on Sea Grant’s success in assisting industry compliance.
University of Connecticut. Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture.
Washington Sea Grant.

Washington State University Extension.

University of Connecticut. College of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources.
University of Minnesota.
IPM of Midwest Landscapes is available for educating growers, landscapers, managers, and consumers in the principles of IPM and its application to managing the over 150 common insect species in Midwest landscapes.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

It has been a wild year with lots of challenges, but MAISRC is still here and working as hard as ever to develop research-based solutions to reduce the impacts of aquatic invasive species in Minnesota. MAISRC hopes the research highlights included in the report will surprise, inspire, and give you hope.

University of Minnesota Extension.

Forest pest first detectors are trained to quickly detect and diagnose early infestations of emerald ash borer, gypsy moth, Asian longhorned beetle, Japanese barberry, Oriental bittersweet and other pests, so that state and federal agencies can control the spread. Become part of the award-winning Minnesota Forest Pest First Detector volunteer program to help the public find new invasive species affecting Minnesota’s trees and forests, or attend as a refresher for those already active as Forest Pest First Detectors.

University of Minnesota. Extension.