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Invasive Species Resources

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Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space; New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team.

If you have a smartphone, the power to protect the natural heritage of New Jersey is at your fingertips! You can use it to help stop the spread of invasive plants, animals and even pathogens that threaten the natural systems and economy of the Garden State.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

To help combat the $1.3 billion threat invasive species pose to Washington's economy every year, the Washington Invasive Species Council is inviting the public to the frontlines of its work by detecting invasive species and reporting them on its newly improved WA Invasives app. The free app enables anyone to report a plant or animal by collecting photographs, geographic coordinates, and sighting information. Users recreating in the backcountry also can collect data offline, when cellular service isn't available. The app also acts as digital field guide.