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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

University of Georgia. Extension.

Circular 868.

Maine Department of Agriculture. Division of Plant Industry.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Forest Service.

University of Maine. Cooperative Extension.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
University of Kentucky. Entomology.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

DNR and partners are working to eradicate a wild population of Argentine black and white tegus in Toombs and Tattnall counties in southeast Georgia. Growing up to 4 feet long and weighing 10 pounds or more, this lizard native to South America is an invasive species that threatens Georgia wildlife. Early detection, rapid response and public involvement are key to stopping tegus in this area. In Toombs and Tattnall, DNR's Wildlife Resources Division, the U.S. Geological Survey and Georgia Southern University are trapping tegus, tracking sightings and assessing the population. Tell DNR when you see a tegu in the wild, alive or dead. These reports help biologists document occurrences and respond effectively. Note the location, take a photo if possible and report the sighting:

Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Resources Division confirmed someone found a northern snakehead in early October in a pond on private property in Gwinnett County, marking the first time the invasive fish has been found in the state. Fishermen who find a northern snakehead should take pictures, note where it was caught and then report it.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

New Hampshire Code of Administrative Rules.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

The Maine Department of Agricultural, Conservation and Forestry (DACF) announced finding egg masses of the invasive spotted lanternfly (SLF) on trees in Maine communities and is urging residents to report any sign of the invasive pest. The egg masses were found on trees from Pennsylvania, where SLF is established and planted in Boothbay, Freeport, Northeast Harbor, and Yarmouth. DACF urges anyone who received goods or materials, such as plants, landscaping materials, or outdoor furniture, from a state with a known SLF infestation to carefully check the materials, including any packaging, for signs of SLF. If any life stages of SLF are found, residents should take a photo or collect the specimen and report any pest potential sightings to bugwatch@maine.gov. Residents should look for large, gray insects, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings, or inch-long, rectangular yellowish-brown egg masses covered with a gray waxy coating.

Because no live SLF has been found in Maine, there is currently no evidence that SLF has become established. The DACF Horticulture Program has inspected all the suspect trees and asks the homeowners and landscape companies to keep an eye on the areas where egg masses were found to confirm that no live populations are present. Spotted lanternfly has not previously been found in Maine.

Lake Stewards of Maine.
Special Note: Formerly known as the Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.
Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.