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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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North Dakota State University. Extension Service.
University of Georgia. Extension.

Circular 868.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln.

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

Montana watercraft inspection stations have intercepted 13 boats carrying invasive mollusks into the state this year. As of May 30, inspectors have caught 12 boats with invasive zebra or quagga mussels and one boat with red rim melania snails attached to watercraft.

Bishop Museum. Hawaii Biological Survey; University of Hawaii.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

DNR and partners are working to eradicate a wild population of Argentine black and white tegus in Toombs and Tattnall counties in southeast Georgia. Growing up to 4 feet long and weighing 10 pounds or more, this lizard native to South America is an invasive species that threatens Georgia wildlife. Early detection, rapid response and public involvement are key to stopping tegus in this area. In Toombs and Tattnall, DNR's Wildlife Resources Division, the U.S. Geological Survey and Georgia Southern University are trapping tegus, tracking sightings and assessing the population. Tell DNR when you see a tegu in the wild, alive or dead. These reports help biologists document occurrences and respond effectively. Note the location, take a photo if possible and report the sighting:

Montana Invasive Species Council.

Montana’s economy could see more than $230 million in annual mitigation costs and lost revenue if invasive mussels become established in the state, according to a report released by the Montana Invasive Species Council (MISC). Commissioned by MISC and completed by the University of Montana Flathead Biological Station, the economic impact study provides “a snapshot of projected direct costs to affected stakeholders dependent on water resources,” said Bryce Christiaens, MISC chair. “It does not reflect the total economic impact to the state, which would be considerably higher.” View a one-page fact sheet (PDF | 484 KB) or the full report (PDF | 4.0 MB).

Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Resources Division confirmed someone found a northern snakehead in early October in a pond on private property in Gwinnett County, marking the first time the invasive fish has been found in the state. Fishermen who find a northern snakehead should take pictures, note where it was caught and then report it.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
USDA. FS. Pacific Southwest Research Station.
Hawaii Invasive Species Council.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Forest Invasive Pests for more resources
Montana State University. Center for Invasive Species Management.
See also: Surveying and Monitoring for more resources
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health; Megacopta Working Group.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Arkansas Invasive Pests for more factsheets