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Invasive Species Resources

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Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. Natural Heritage Program.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

Montana State University. Center for Invasive Species Management.
See also: Surveying and Monitoring for more resources
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health; Megacopta Working Group.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
See also: Resources for Agricultural Insects Pests for more factsheets
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
In May of 2018, the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa confirmed the finding of the Haemaphysalis longicornis tick (otherwise known as the East Asian or Longhorned tick) in Virginia. It was previously unknown in the state, but since then has been detected in 24 counties, mostly in the western part of the state. "The tiny tick can appear on cows, horses and other livestock," said State Veterinarian Dr. Charles Broaddus. "In addition to being a nuisance, they also can be a health risk, especially to newborn or young animals." If you believe you have found the Longhorned tick, notify your local office of the Cooperative Extension Service.
Montana State University. Extension Service.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announces a $837,000 grant to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to combat invasive mussels in Montana. These grant funds will be used to improve inspection/decontamination stations; provide campsites for inspection staff; purchase inspection and decontamination equipment, materials and supplies, outreach materials, storage sheds, and shelters; and also provide for sampling and analysis.
Montana State University. Extension Service.
Montana Invasive Species Advisory Council.
Prepared by: Creative Resource Strategies, LLC. In 2015, the Council contracted with Creative Resource Strategies, LLC to conduct an assessment and gap analysis of Montana's invasive species programs. This report documents the outcomes of that assessment and analysis, and includes an articulation of key gaps as well as a set of recommendations to refine strategies and approaches, and enhance efficiencies, to address invasive species. It is important to recognize that the information from survey respondents represents a snapshot in time—the 2015 fiscal y ear—for each contributing entity. In addition, the information obtained from survey respondents was, in numerous cases, incomplete, and in some cases, not accurate. Nevertheless, the information obtained is of value to identify gaps and inform a set of recommendations.

Montana Noxious Weed Education Campaign.

Montana Department of Agriculture.
See also: Noxious Weeds for more resources
Montana Weed Control Association.

Google. YouTube; Montana Department of Agriculture.