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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
With the quarantine of ash trees in Arkansas, the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) to millions of Oklahoma ash trees intensifies for southeastern Oklahoma, especially McCurtain and Le Flore counties. As the pest is literally next door, Oklahoma Forestry Services is asking Oklahomans to help prevent the infestation spread and be on the lookout and report any signs that the insect is in the state. Please notify Oklahoma Forestry Services at 405-522-6158 if you see signs of EAB infestation in ash trees. For more information about the Emerald Ash Borer visit www.forestry.ok.gov/tree-pest-alerts.
University of Georgia. Cooperative Extension.
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Woody Ornamentals for more fact sheets.
Oklahoma State University. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Diseases-Topical for more fact sheets
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
The emerald ash borer is a federally regulated pest, which means its detection will trigger specific regulations that are designed to help prevent its man assisted spread. The USDA, GA Dept. of Agriculture and GA Forestry Commission have been working together to ensure that the regulations minimally impact businesses but at the same time, will limit the likelihood emerald ash borer will be moved in ash nursery stock, or in logs, mulch, firewood, and other similar items.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Oklahoma State University. Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.

DOI. National Park Service.

Oklahoma State University. Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology.
Note: Maps of potential range expansion for the red imported fire ant in Oklahoma and the United States
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation.
"Forest Health Highlights" (FHHs) are an annual summary of forest insect and disease conditions in Montana. They summarize key findings from the Montana Forest Insect and Disease Conditions and Program Highlights report along with project updates specific to the Montana DNRC Forest Pest Management program.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
Kentucky Department for Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.
Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. Forestry Division.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
As part of the statewide effort to address the risks of invasive mussels, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks plans to create a new bureau to manage the prevention, detection and control of aquatic invasive species within state borders. The Aquatic Invasive Species Bureau will be housed in FWP's Fisheries Division, with plans to be operational beginning in March.
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.