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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Pathology Extension Publications for more resources
Georgia Department of Agriculture. Plant Industry.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Following the detection of invasive aquatic mussel larvae in Nov 2016, the State of Montana's Mussel Response Team was formed to rapidly assess the extent and severity of the mussel incident impacting Montana's waterways. Aquatic invasive species (AIS), including diseases, are easily spread from one water body to the other. To protect Montana’s waters and native aquatic species, please follow the rules and guidelines... clean, drain, dry.
Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Consumer Protection Services.

If you suspect you have any of the invasive insects or disease on our list, take a picture and send it to us. Or, fill out the form and just let us know about it! Your personal information will be kept confidential, but we may need to contact you for further information.

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands.

As of Jul 2011, New Hampshire has banned the importation of untreated firewood without a commercial or home heating compliance agreement. Firewood is a major source of damaging insects and diseases. This ban will help protect the health on New Hampshire's forests.

University of Georgia. College of Veterinary Medicine. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study.
University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension.
As of February 2015, brown marmorated stinkbug (BMSB) has been confirmed in 20 New Hampshire towns/cities. With the exception of a confirmation on nursery stock (shipped several months earlier from Long Island, NY), no specimens have yet been found on any crop. The vast majority of specimens have been found on or in buildings. We need your help. We want to find out where BMSB occurs in New Hampshire. Let us know if you see this species in or on your New Hampshire home. Verbal descriptions are not much use, but clear, close-up photos or specimens are helpful. We want to track this insect in NH and how it builds in numbers.
Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation.
Publication NF-WF-10-01, 2nd Edition