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Invasive Species Resources

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Mississippi River Basin Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species.
Rapid response actions are often complex, costly, and controversial, and therefore advanced planning for rapid response prior to an introduction is crucial. The Mississippi River Basin Panel on AIS (MRBP) has developed this model rapid response plan and supplemental attachments to assist natural resources management agencies effectively plan and quickly implement rapid response actions. In addition to providing information on rapid response planning, the model plan includes a template that can be used by states in developing their own rapid response plans. See also: MRBP Documents for more resources.
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.
This guide contains a collection of hands-on activities that are easy for teachers to use in the classroom and in the schoolyard. The curriculum is designed for kindergarten through 12th grade and most activities are tied to the Georgia Performance Standards. The guide is available to all formal and non-formal educators online at www.gaeppc.org and through workshops offered in the metro-Atlanta area. Classroom teachers, park naturalists, environmental education specialists, and others can adapt these activities to fit easily into their programs.
Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The goal of this project is to raise awareness about invasive species and to turn that awareness into action to prevent and to manage current and future invasions. The project consists of lesson plans and corresponding hands-on items designed to teach the story about invasive species. Each lesson plan has been aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, Common Core Standards, and Maryland Environmental Literacy Standards. Lesson plans in each module include activities for Grades 3-12.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
University of Maryland. Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Have a plant or pest question? Questions from Maryland and the District of Columbia are answered by Home and Garden Information Center’s Certified Professional Horticulturists. If you are located outside of these areas, you will be asked to enter your state and county. Your question will be forwarded to the appropriate extension expert.
University of Georgia. Bugwood Network.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
A Notice of Final Action for the Maryland Invasive Plant Regulations was published in the Maryland Register on Friday, February 3. These regulations went into effect February 13. The updated regulations add a total of four new species to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 lists established by the original invasive plant regulations (April 2016). Weed risk assessments are ongoing, and additional plant species will be added to the lists through the regulatory process as they are completed and approved. These science-based assessments are the foundation for decisions regarding a plant’s invasive status in the state. Full assessment reports are available on the Maryland Invasive Plants Prevention and Control website.
University of Georgia. Cooperative Extension.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
The emerald ash borer is a federally regulated pest, which means its detection will trigger specific regulations that are designed to help prevent its man assisted spread. The USDA, GA Dept. of Agriculture and GA Forestry Commission have been working together to ensure that the regulations minimally impact businesses but at the same time, will limit the likelihood emerald ash borer will be moved in ash nursery stock, or in logs, mulch, firewood, and other similar items.

DOI. National Park Service.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.
The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed that a single adult spotted lanternfly has been found on a trap in the northeast corner of Cecil County near the border of Pennsylvania and Delaware. This is the first confirmed sighting of the invasive species in Maryland, and the department does not believe there is an established population of the pest in the state. If you suspect you have found a spotted lantern fly egg mass, nymph, or adult, snap a picture of it, collect it, put it in a plastic bag, freeze it, and report it to the Maryland Department of Agriculture at DontBug.MD@maryland.gov.