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Invasive Species Resources

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Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program.
Much needed attention has been directed at some particularly problematic aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes, such as Asian carps and zebra and quagga mussels. But others invaders, like crayfish, can also take their toll on the lakes. Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant (IISG) has created a new collaborative that brings together a variety of experts and stakeholders to address the threat of invasive crayfish. The Invasive Crayfish Collaborative (ICC), includes 68 experts and other stakeholders from government agencies, universities, non-profit organizations, and private businesses to combine resources and expertise to address priority invasive crayfish research and outreach needs.
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.
This guide contains a collection of hands-on activities that are easy for teachers to use in the classroom and in the schoolyard. The curriculum is designed for kindergarten through 12th grade and most activities are tied to the Georgia Performance Standards. The guide is available to all formal and non-formal educators online at www.gaeppc.org and through workshops offered in the metro-Atlanta area. Classroom teachers, park naturalists, environmental education specialists, and others can adapt these activities to fit easily into their programs.
Georgia Department of Agriculture.
University of Wisconsin Sea Grant.
The Aquatic Invaders Attack Pack is filled with materials to help teach groups about Great Lakes aquatic invasive species (AIS), the problems they cause and what can be done about them. Each pack includes preserved specimens of some of the most problematic AIS in the Great Lakes, rugged plastic fact sheets and a classroom guide. Additional materials are available for download.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The goal of this project is to raise awareness about invasive species and to turn that awareness into action to prevent and to manage current and future invasions. The project consists of lesson plans and corresponding hands-on items designed to teach the story about invasive species. Each lesson plan has been aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, Common Core Standards, and Maryland Environmental Literacy Standards. Lesson plans in each module include activities for Grades 3-12.

Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission.
DOC. NOAA. National Marine Fisheries Service. West Coast Region.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

University of Maryland. Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Have a plant or pest question? Questions from Maryland and the District of Columbia are answered by Home and Garden Information Center’s Certified Professional Horticulturists. If you are located outside of these areas, you will be asked to enter your state and county. Your question will be forwarded to the appropriate extension expert.
University of Georgia. Bugwood Network.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
U.S. Government Printing Office. Federal Depository Library Program Electronic Collection Archive.
Compiled and Edited by: Gregory Ruiz and David Reid, NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-142.
See also: GLERL Technical Reports for more reports
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
A Notice of Final Action for the Maryland Invasive Plant Regulations was published in the Maryland Register on Friday, February 3. These regulations went into effect February 13. The updated regulations add a total of four new species to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 lists established by the original invasive plant regulations (April 2016). Weed risk assessments are ongoing, and additional plant species will be added to the lists through the regulatory process as they are completed and approved. These science-based assessments are the foundation for decisions regarding a plant’s invasive status in the state. Full assessment reports are available on the Maryland Invasive Plants Prevention and Control website.