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Citrus Greening Resources

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USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

New clues to how the bacteria associated with citrus greening infect the only insect that carries them could lead to a way to block the microbes' spread from tree to tree, according to a study in Infection and Immunity by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) scientists.

USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

Dogs specially trained by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have proven to be the most efficient way to detect huanglongbing—also known as citrus greening—according to a paper just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Currently, the only solid hope of curtailing the spread of citrus greening is to eliminate trees with the disease as quickly as possible to prevent further spread. Early detection of the citrus greening pathogen is crucial because trees can be infected and act as a source to spread the disease months or years before showing symptoms that are detectable by the naked eye. ARS plant epidemiologist Timothy R. Gottwald with the U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory in Fort Pierce, Florida, discovered that dogs can be trained to sniff out the presence of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the bacteria that causes citrus greening, with greater than 99 percent accuracy.

California Department of Food and Agriculture. Plant Health Division.
University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.
Provides information to both growers and home gardeners, in two distinct sub-sites -- to get the basics on the insect and the disease it can vector, how to inspect your trees, how to treat your tree if you find ACP, critical things to do to help contain the insect population and deal with Huanglongbing (HLB), as well as additional information more specific to California.

University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.

ANR Publication 8218

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

See also: Citrus Resource

USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection and Quarantine.

Contains the legal description of current federal quarantine areas for several citrus pests and diseases. Users can search by state and pest to determine the quarantine area(s) by state. An interactive map of quarantine areas is also available.

Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries.
A plant disease that presents a serious threat to the U.S. citrus industry has been detected in Alabama. Federal and state plant health officials have confirmed the identification of citrus greening (CG), also known as Huanglongbing or HLB, which is caused by the bacterial pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This is the first confirmation of citrus greening in Alabama despite biannual surveys for the pathogen by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI).
Citrus Greening Solutions.

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Louisiana State University. AgCenter Research and Extension.
See also: Plant Diagnostic Center - Publications for more resources

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.
Electronic Data Information Source - publication resources
European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection and Quarantine.

A Federal Order is a legal document issued in response to an emergency when the Administrator of APHIS considers it necessary to take regulatory action to protect agriculture or prevent the entry and establishment into the United States of a pest or disease. Federal Orders are effective immediately and contain the specific regulatory requirements.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

You can become a more effective First Detector by familiarizing yourself with invasive target pests and pathogens known to exist in the U.S. If you think you have encountered one of the species or disease complexes listed, report its presence.

USDA. Agricultural Research Service.