What's New

See What's New on the NISIC Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date. Items are kept in this section for a period of two years from post date.

Note: Oct 24, 2013 -- We have migrated our What's New section to a new interface (Drupal). If you have previously bookmarked our What's New section (weblogs.nal.usda.gov/invasivespecies), please update your bookmark to the new location (http://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/whats-new).

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Use our Custom Search Engine to search for invasive species information included in the What's New section of NISIC's site:


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Common buckthorn is an invasive plant introduced to the U.S. in the early 1800s (or possibly earlier) as an ornamental plant. Common buckthorn forms dense stands that dominate ecosystems and displace native species.

* See our Plants section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 12, 2012


Oregon State University.

When debris from the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan began making its way toward the West Coast of the U.S., there were fears of possible radiation and chemical contamination as well as costly cleanup. But a nearly 70' floating dock that unexpectedly washed ashore in Newport, Oregon has been traced back to the Japanese disaster has brought with it a completely different threat -- invasive species. Scientists at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center said the cement float contains about 13 pounds of organisms per square foot.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 12, 2012


Pollinator Partnership.

Five years ago the U.S. Senate's unanimous approval and designation of the final week in June as "National Pollinator Week" marked a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations. Pollinator Week has now grown to be an international celebration of the valuable ecosystem services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles.


DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 05, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Butternut Canker is a lethal disease which is killing butternut trees throughout its range in North America. The disease was first detected in the U.S.. in 1967, but may have been present before then. The wood from butternut trees is valued for furniture, paneling, specialty products, and carving. Butternut produces nuts for wildlife and is important for commercial nut production.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 05, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Chestnut Blight is a fungal disease that virtually eliminated mature American chestnuts from the U.S. The disease was introduced on nursery stock imported from Asia and was first discovered in 1904.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 05, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Florida Lake Management Society 23rd Annual Conference - "Lake Management in a Time of Budget Cuts" -- Jun 18-21, 2012

65th Annual California Weed Science Society Conference -- Jan 23-25, 2013

2013 MRNRC (Missouri River Natural Resources Committee) Conference and BiOP Forum -- Mar 11-14, 2013

International Didymo Conference -- Mar 12-13, 2013

* See our Conference Calendar for more information and resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 05, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Beech bar disease is a fungal disease that kills American beech trees after being attacked by the beech scale insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga). The disease was Introduced accidentally on imported European beech saplings and was introduced to Canada during the late 1800s and first appeared in the U.S. during the 1930s.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 04, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Burmese pythons are native to Southeast Asia and were imported to the U.S. for the pet trade. Wild populations became established in 2000 in Florida from animals that escaped or were intentionally released. Burmese pythons prey on native species and may also compete with threatened native species.

* See our Animals section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 04, 2012


U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA will support 321 projects in all 50 states that help to prevent the introduction or spread of plant pests and diseases threatening U.S. agricultural and the environment. The funding, totaling $50 million, is provided by Section 10201 of the 2008 Farm Bill. See Plant Pest and Disease Management and Disaster Prevention Programs for more information.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 24, 2012


Fox News; Associated Press.

Asian carp are in direct competition with native aquatic species for food and habitat. Their rapid population increase is disrupting the ecology and food web of the large rivers of the Midwest, including the Missouri River. Last year's hurricanes and flooding not only engulfed homes and carried away roads and bridges in hard-hit areas of the country, it dispersed aggressive invasive species as well. See additional related news from USGS's Invasive Carp Research Program.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 24, 2012


Weed Science Society of America.

Online databases and new smartphone applications are making it easier than ever to track and map infestations of invasive weeds. New technologies are also making it easier than ever to capture and report information on the location of weeds so that online databases are more complete. Previously, weed sightings were submitted to EDDMapSusing detailed online forms. But the new applications are game changers. Now home gardeners, backpackers and other laypeople likely to encounter invasive weeds can participate as well. See our Smartphone Applications page for more information.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 23, 2012


DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in partnership with many organizations, has spent more than $6 million since 2005 finding and applying solutions to the growing problem of Burmese pythons and other large invasive constrictor snakes in Florida. For more information, see Rule Making to List Four Constrictor Snake Species Under the Lacey Act: Final Economic Analysis (Jan 12, 2012; PDF | 687 KB).

* See our Economic Impacts section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 23, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Pacific NorthWest Economic Region's 2012 Invasive Species Conference - "The Power of Partnerships" -- Jul 19-19, 2012

7th Ballast Water Management -- Sep 19-20, 2012

International Conference & Exhibition Ballast Water Management 2012 (ICBWM2012) - "Operational Experience of Ballast Water Treatment Systems" -- Nov 14-16, 2012

3rd International Research Conference on Huanglongbing (IRCHLB III) -- Feb 4-7, 2013

* See our Conference Calendar for more information and resources.

 
Post Date: May 23, 2012


USDA. Blog.

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is one of many "Hungry Pests" that can cause significant damage to our country's natural resources. Since first being identified in 2002, EAB is responsible for the destruction of tens of millions of ash trees in 15 states in the Midwest and Northeast. Help keep EAB from spreading by not moving firewood and by inspecting your trees regularly.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 22, 2012


Great Lakes Coalition. Healing Our Waters.

State and federal agencies recently completed construction of a $1.6 million sea lamprey barrier in Trail Creek, a Lake Michigan tributary in northern Indiana. The barrier will prevent sea lamprey from spawning in the creek, which will reduce the number of these monstrous, blood-sucking invaders in Lake Michigan. The barrier and other efforts to control sea lamprey are paramount to efforts to maintain a healthy Great Lakes fishery. Each sea lamprey can consume up to 40 pounds of fish during its time in the lakes.

* See our Species Profile - Sea Lamprey page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 16, 2012


Great Lakes Coalition. Healing Our Waters.
Congress introduced new bills aimed at combating the spread of Asian carp into the Great Lakes. The legislation directs the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to complete within 18 months its study on how to separate the Great Lakes and Mississippi watersheds to block the advance of the non-native Asian carp. The voracious fish are within miles of Lake Michigan. Scientists fear that an Asian carp invasion into the Great Lakes could devastate the region's $7 billion sport and commercial fishery. The legislation updates the Stop Asian Carp Act of 2011, which was introduced last year. For more information on the bills introduced, see Congressional Bills - 112th Congress.

* See our Species Profile - Asian Carps page for more information and resources.

 
Post Date: May 16, 2012


USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

ARS is studying a potential biological control for the kudzu bug, which does feed on the kudzu vine, but also could be a major pest of soybeans, peanuts and other legumes.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 08, 2012


eXtension.

Ohioans who have questions -- on everything from personal finance to agricultural enterprise budgets, from gardening to crop production, from nutrition to producing fruits and vegetables safely -- have a new way to find answers.

* See our Ohio state resource page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 08, 2012


Harvard University. School of Public Health.

The likely culprit in sharp worldwide declines in honeybee , known as colony collapse disorder (CCD), since 2006 is imidacloprid, one of the most widely used pesticides, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. Pinpointing the cause of the problem is crucial because bees -- beyond producing honey -- are prime pollinators of roughly one-third of the crop species in the U.S. and livestock feed. Massive loss of honeybees could result in billions of dollars in agricultural losses, experts estimate.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 01, 2012


USDA. Blog.

USDA and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services have been fighting to stop the spread of the giant African snail. In six, months, more than 40,000 of these snails have been collected. Alert homeowners are the first line of defense in reporting signs of snail infestations. Please do your part in the fight against invasive species -- if you have a giant African snail or see the snails or signs of their presence, call the toll-free helpline at 888-397-1517.

* See our Species Profile - Giant African Snail page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 01, 2012


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