What's New

See What's New on the NISIC Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date. Items are kept in this section for a period of two years from post date.

Note: Oct 24, 2013 -- We have migrated our What's New section to a new interface (Drupal). If you have previously bookmarked our What's New section (weblogs.nal.usda.gov/invasivespecies), please update your bookmark to the new location (http://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/whats-new).

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Use our Custom Search Engine to search for invasive species information included in the What's New section of NISIC's site:


DOI. USGS. Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk.

The Global Compendium of Weeds is a list of plant species (over 28,000 names) that have been cited in specific references (approximately 1,000) as weeds. The online information is current based on the data set Jan 24, 2007, and is more recent than the book version (printed in 2002) by Rod Randall, Department of Agriculture of Western Australia (AgWest).

Updated edition available - A Global Compendium of Weeds, 2nd Edition (2012; PDF | 7.3 MB); this edition is just over 200 pages longer than the first (now 1,115 pages), but there are over 12,000 additional names listed (33,000+), and more than 1,000 new references.

* See our Plants - Databases section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 23, 2012


Centre for Agricultural Bioscience International (CABI).

Invasive Species are a major problem in the U.S., causing significant harm to the environment, the economy, and to animal and human health. Learn how the Invasive Species Compendium is helping in the battle to control them. See the "Using the Invasive Species Compendium in your federal agency" live demonstration for more information.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 21, 2012


Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
FWC recently made changes that will increase lionfish harvesting opportunities, which are currently in effect through Aug 2013: a recreational fishing license is not required for recreational fishers targeting lionfish while using a pole spear, a Hawaiian Sling, a handheld net or any spearing device that is specifically designed and marketed exclusively for lionfish. There is no recreational or commercial harvest bag limit for lionfish. Learn more about lionfish or read the new State of Florida Executive Order 12-12 (PDF | 167 KB) on lionfish harvesting.

* See our Aquatic Species - What You Can Do for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 14, 2012


USDA. Blog.

Throughout August, the Asian longhorned beetle may emerge from the trees in your community. This destructive beetle kills 13 types of hardwood trees, from the inside out. Early detection is crucial in the fight to save trees from the Asian longhorned beetle. Learn how to detect and report the beetle to improve a community's chances for saving its trees.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 14, 2012


ScienceDaily; University of Florida. Florida Museum of Natural History.

University of Florida researchers curating a 17-foot-7-inch Burmese python, the largest found in Florida, discovered 87 eggs in the snake, also a state record. "It means these snakes are surviving a long time in the wild, there's nothing stopping them and the native wildlife are in trouble."

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 14, 2012


Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection.

The Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) found in Prospect, CT has been confirmed by federal regulatory officials. This is the first record of this pest in Connecticut, which is added to 15 other states where infestations have been detected.

* See our Emerging Issues section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 01, 2012


New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.

The legislation signed by the Governor will help address the risk to New York's environment associated with invasive species becoming established within the state. The new law provides the Department of Environmental Conservation and the Department of Agriculture and Markets with the authority to regulate the sale, purchase, possession, introduction, importation and transport of invasive species and establishes penalties for those who violate such regulations.

* See our New York state resource page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 01, 2012


USDA. Blog.

See how you can help prevent aquatic invasive species and protect our waters!

* See our Aquatic Species - What You Can Do for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jul 27, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Provides general resources to help identify unknown species that may be invasive. Species identification is important in helping gardeners, land managers, and landscape architects identify invasive species that can be harmful to local habitats.

* See our Resource Library - Identification Resources section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jul 19, 2012


Invasive Plant Science and Management - Apr-Jun 2012 (Vol 5, Issue 2)

Articles include:

Fire as a Tool for Controlling Tamarix spp. Seedlings
Assessing Stakeholder Perspectives on Invasive Plants to Inform Risk Analysis
Mowing Any Time after Midsummer Can Manage Japanese Stiltgrass
-- and more...

Note: Article abstracts are available to everyone. Full-text articles may require a subscription (USDA access through DigiTop).

* See our Scientific Journals page to view the first 5 abstracts or all abstracts, and additional resources. And, also see our Scientific Journal Articles section for more resources.

 
Post Date: Jul 19, 2012


ScienceDaily; The Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

A coalition of researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and staff from the Norwegian Biodiversity Information Centre have created a unique quantitative method that enables researchers and others to assess the environmental risks posed by non-native species. While the method is tailored to the Norwegian environment, it can easily be adapted to other countries, and fills a vital need internationally for a quantifiable, uniform approach to classifying and assessing alien species, the developers say. This approachmayhelp determine how dangerous an introduced species will be in its new environment before the damage takes place.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jul 17, 2012


ScienceDaily; University of Alberta. Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry (Canada).

Researchers are making every effort to put an end to the threat of West nile virus spreading to the brain, causing severe illness and sometimes death.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jul 17, 2012


U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown.

Bipartisan legislation to stop Asian carp from destroying the Great Lakes' ecosystem has passed both houses of Congress and is now poised to become law. The Stop Invasive Species Act, of which Brown was an original cosponsor, would require the expedited creation of a plan to block Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes through a number of rivers and tributaries across the Great Lakes region.

* See our Federal Press Releases - Senate section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jul 03, 2012


Pesticide Mitigation Risk Engine.

PRiME is a user-friendly, online tool that ranks pesticide products for impacts on birds, earthworms, small mammals, aquatic ecosystems and worker/bystander health and safety. This tool applies best available science to permit producers, advisors and regulatory professionals to compare different pest management scenarios for any commodity and select options with the fewest potential environmental and health hazards.

* See our Control - Mechanisms section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jul 03, 2012


University of Georgia. UGA Today.

A new University of Georgia study shows that some native clearweed plants have evolved resistance to invasive garlic mustard plants -- and that the invasive plants appear to be waging a counterattack. The study, published in the early edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is thought to provide the first evidence of coevolution between native and invasive plant species. See article Coevolution between invasive and native plants driven by chemical competition and soil biotafor more information.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 29, 2012


Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

Iowa tree and bug experts are looking for the presence of a beetle that could cause problems with Iowa's valuable black walnut industry. Thousand cankers disease is specific to walnuts and has been confirmed in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, and Washington in the 1990s. Recently, the disease has been confirmed in Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Virginia. It has not been found in Iowa. The disease is introduced into a tree by the walnut twig beetle that carries a fungus on its body. The plant pathogen is spread under the bark of walnut trees when the beetle creates its extensive galleries.

* See our Iowa state resource page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 29, 2012


U.S. Department of Agriculture.

U.S. Forest Service and Canadian Forest Service of Natural Resources Canada officials convened here for the first forest health summit between the two countries to discuss issues of common concern such as invasive species. "The borders that separate the United States and Canada don't segregate threats to our natural resources," said U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. "The countries share common environmental concerns. It is critical that we continue to collaborate and address current and future land management challenges as partners."

* See our Federal Press Releases - USDA section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 29, 2012


USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

When an insect pierces the surface of a plant to feed, much of the action takes place in the plant's interior. A device called the Electrical Penetration Graph is a critical tool for peering into the process. Now a new type of EPG developed by USDA entomologists is giving scientists the clearest view yet of the wars waged between piercing-sucking insects and the plants they attack.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 18, 2012


AlphaGalileo Foundation.

An international team of scientists have published the first continent-wide assessment of the Antarctic's biogeography, and propose that the landmass should be divided into 15 distinct conservation regions to protect the continent from invasive alien species. Invasive species are identified as one of the biggest threats to Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems, particularly in a warming climate.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 18, 2012


Time Science.

Scientists from around the world looked at past research on ecological change, and found that the planet may be approaching a "critical transition," otherwise known as a "tipping point," as a result of human activity like agriculture and urbanization. There are signs that climate change, habitat loss and population growth is dramatically reshaping life on Earth, an international team of researchers recently reported in the journal Nature. See the related article Biodiversity loss and its impact on humanity (Jun 6, 2012)

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 12, 2012


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