What's New

See What's New on the NISIC Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date. Items are kept in this section for a period of two years from post date.

Note: Oct 24, 2013 -- We have migrated our What's New section to a new interface (Drupal). If you have previously bookmarked our What's New section (weblogs.nal.usda.gov/invasivespecies), please update your bookmark to the new location (http://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/whats-new).

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Use our Custom Search Engine to search for invasive species information included in the What's New section of NISIC's site:


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Japanese barberry was introduced as an ornamental and promoted as a replacement for common barberry (Berberis vulgaris), which is a host for black stem rust. Japanese barberry forms dense stands that compete with native trees and herbaceous plants.

* See our Plants section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jan 08, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Karnal bunt is a fungal disease that infects wheat, reducing quality and yield. Karnal bunt was first detected in the U.S. in 1996, possibly arrived from Mexico in shipments of contaminated grain.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jan 08, 2013


University of Minnesota. Collegeof Continuing Education.

IPM3 is a consortium of federal agencies and land-grant institutions dedicated to the efficient and timely delivery of practical integrated pest information to individuals responsible for developing and implementing Integrated Pest Management (IPM). IPM3 provides a Web-based, distance delivery opportunity for people interested in IPM to become proficient in the principles and application of IPM. Increasing the quality and consistency of IPM training among Federal agencies and their adoption of an IPM approach for invasive species management will certainly help minimize harm to the environment, to human health, and to wildlife. See Registration page to register online.

* See our Education for Professionals - General Course Information section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 08, 2013


Invasive Plants Association of Wisconsin. (IPAW)

One of the basic principles of invasive plant management is early detection. To that end, IPAW is sponsoring a reward program to encourage and provide incentive for citizens of the state to look for and report prohibited invasive plants.

* See our Wisconsin state resource page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 07, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

This updated workbook for federal fiscal year 2013 contains basic information on programs in USDA that could be used to fund and support invasive species related projects. This list should be a helpful place to start a search for sources of technical and financial resources for invasive species activities but may not include all potential invasive species funding opportunities. Please use this workbook to help in your important and vital work in safeguarding and enhancing natural, recreational and agricultural resources.

The USDA hopes this information is helpful for those working with invasive species. Partnerships and cost-sharing programs help all of us advance our goals of protecting our agricultural resources and ensure safe, healthy land and water for all of us to enjoy. Join with USDA in fighting invasive species: prepare, protect, and prevent. Thank you for all your hard work and all your future work in this important area.

* See our U.S. Department of Agriculture Grant and Partnership Programs for Invasive Species page for more information.

 
Post Date: Jan 07, 2013


NTV abc News.

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has not been found in Nebraska, but has been found in states surrounding Nebraska, including Iowa, Missouri and Kansas. Professional foresters believe it is spreading mainly by transfer of infested firewood along major highways. To help avoid the spread of EAB and other tree diseases, Nebraska residents needing to buy firewood this winter are being asked to purchase locally harvested wood to keep plant diseases and insects from spreading to the state. See Emerald Ash Borer information from Nebraska Department of Agriculture and if you suspect an EAB infestation in Nebraska.

* See our Nebraska state resource page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 07, 2013


Science Daily; Michigan Technological University.

Phragmites australis, an invasive species of plant called common reed, grows rapidly into dense stands of tall plants that pose an extreme threat to Great Lakes coastal wetlands. Early treatment is the key to controlling Phragmites. Scientists have mapped the U.S. coastline of all five Great Lakes using satellite technologies. The Phragmitesmap is the first of its kind. It is "a highly accurate data set that will allow national, regional and local managers to visualize the extent of Phragmitesinvasion in the Great Lakes and strategically plan efforts to manage existing populations and minimize new colonization."

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Dec 26, 2012


University of Florida.

Because it is a fairly inaccessible region with political unrest, much of the Congo’s insect biodiversity remains largely undiscovered. Focusing on a group of leaf-mining moths, researchers name 41 new species, nearly doubling the number previously known from the region. Leaf miners occur worldwide and the biodiversity research is important because some species are agricultural pests, while others help control unwanted invasive plant species.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Dec 21, 2012


Invasive Plant Control.

A twist of the original poem 'Twas the Night Before Christmas', with the perspective of an invasive species biologist. Also see the "Twelve Days of Aquatic Invasive Species Christmas" (Dec 19, 2012) from Tim Campbell with the Wisconsin Sea Grant working with Aquatic Invasive Species.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Dec 21, 2012


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