What's New

See What's New on the NISIC Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date. Items are kept in this section for a period of two years from post date.

Note: Oct 24, 2013 -- We have migrated our What's New section to a new interface (Drupal). If you have previously bookmarked our What's New section (weblogs.nal.usda.gov/invasivespecies), please update your bookmark to the new location (http://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/whats-new).

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Use our Custom Search Engine to search for invasive species information included in the What's New section of NISIC's site:


DHS. Customs and Border Protection.

As Valentine's Day quickly approaches U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) diligently inspects shipments of imported cut flowers to prevent the spread of insects or pests that may damage national and local agriculture.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Feb 12, 2013


USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

USDA scientists are helping citrus growers and juice processors address the threat posed by Huanglongbing (HLB), a disease that is costing the citrus industry millions of dollars each year.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Feb 12, 2013


USDA. Forest Service.

USDA has released a comprehensive syntheses of the scientific literature on climate change effects and adaptation strategies for U.S. agriculture and forests. Scientists from the Federal service, universities, non-governmental organizations, industry, tribal lands and the private sector contributed to the national stakeholder workshops and the peer-reviewed studies. The reports evaluate current conditions and look ahead to the next 25 to 100 years and the potential consequences of climate change.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Feb 06, 2013


DOI. NPS. Mammoth Cave National Park (Kentucky).

Officials have confirmed the presence of a deadly bat fungus, white-nose syndrome, in Mammoth Cave National Park in Kentucky. The fungus has already killed millions of bats across the Northeast and in the Midwest.

* See our Emerging Issues section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Feb 06, 2013


Department of Interior.

Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar has appointed 14 new members to the Invasive Species Advisory Committee, which provides advice and recommendations to the National Invasive Species Council. The next ISAC Meeting will be held Mar 7-8, 2013 in Arlington, Virginia.

* See our Federal Press Releases - Department of the Interior page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Feb 06, 2013


Washington Invasive Species Council.

This report to the Legislature summarizes the work of the council during the past year and discusses the threat invasive species pose to Washington's landscape, industry, and wildlife, and people. See the top priorities for invasive species in Washington. See the top priorities identified by the Council which pose the greatest threat to the state's environment, economy, and human health.

* See our Washington page for more information and resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 18, 2013


Department of Environment and Natural Resources (Philippines).

The Philippine Department of Environmental and Natural Resources launched the Philippine component of an internationally-funded project on invasive alien species (IAS). The project, entitled "Removing Barriers to Invasive Species Management in the Production and Protection Forests in Southeast Asia" is funded by the Global Environment Fund (GEF) through the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP).

* See our Asia page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 16, 2013


The James Hutton Institute (United Kingdom).

A study by scientists has warned the organism responsible for the Irish potato famine is still a major threat. The team said the results showed the need for strategies to protect potatoes from disease. Phytophtora infestans is a fungus like organism that causes late blight in potatoes. It infects leaves, stems and tubers and can cause devastating crop losses.

* See our Species Profile - Late Blight page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 15, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Kansas Natural Resource Conference - Under Attack: Invasive Species in Kansas -- Jan 24-25, 2013

Invasive Species Advisory Committee Meeting -- Mar 7-8, 2013

Freshwater Invasives - Networking for Strategy -- Apr 8-11, 2013

9th Annual Artic Shipping Forum -- Apr 23-25, 2013

2013 Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council / South East Exotic Pest Plant Council (SE-EPPC) Joint Annual Symposium - Plant Wars: The EPPC's Strike Back -- May 21-23, 2013

4th Meeting for the IUFRO Work Unit on Invasive Species in International Trade -- Oct 23-Nov 1, 2013

* See our Conference Calendar for more information and resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 15, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Provides best management practices to prevent or mitigate invasive species establishment or movement.

* See our Prevention section for more information and resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 15, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Provides general resources for smartphones applications to assist in tracking, monitoring various species, including invasive species.

* See our Monitoring section for more information and resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 15, 2013


National Geographic. News Watch.

Antarctica and the Southern Ocean may seem very far away from civilization, but they are at great risk of losing their unique qualities due to human activities. Warmer temperatures and human visitation are increasing the likelihood that invasive species can take up residence in the Antarctic, and potentially cause major changes. Two studies have found evidence of invasions both on land (from a midge) and at sea (from crabs). The remoteness of the Antarctic can no longer protect it from potentially destructive invaders.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 14, 2013


DOI. USGS. Science Features.

The fungus, white-nose syndrome (WNS), that has killed millions of bats in eastern North America since 2006 can survive in the environment for long periods of time, according to new research. This research has important implications for managing WNS and vulnerable bat species by revealing the important role that the environment plays in the disease. The findings suggest that susceptible bats may not be able to effectively re-colonize caves and mines that have been previously contaminated and that the reintroduction of certain bat species to such sites may not be a sound strategy for reestablishing lost populations.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 14, 2013


USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

First detected in the U.S. a decade ago, the brown brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is now in at least 39 states, is wreaking havoc in homes and gardens, and is a major economic threat to orchard fruits, garden vegetables and row crops. ARS researchers are making progress in developing ways to deal with the brown marmorated stink bug, now USDA number one "invasive insect of interest."

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 14, 2013


University of California - Davis.

Well-intentioned children and aquarium hobbyists seeking to "free" their pet fish down a toilet bowl or into a local waterway may inadvertently be contributing to the threat of invasive species downstream, according to a new report from the University of California, Davis. See Aquatic Invasive Species Vector Risk Assessments for more information.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 10, 2013


Wildlife Foundation of Florida.

The intent of the 2013 Python Challenge™ is to raise public awareness about Burmese pythons and how this invasive species is a threat to the Everglades ecosystem, including native wildlife.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 10, 2013


University of Minnesota. Collegeof Continuing Education.

IPM3 is a consortium of federal agencies and land-grant institutions dedicated to the efficient and timely delivery of practical integrated pest information to individuals responsible for developing and implementing Integrated Pest Management (IPM). IPM3 provides a Web-based, distance delivery opportunity for people interested in IPM to become proficient in the principles and application of IPM. Increasing the quality and consistency of IPM training among Federal agencies and their adoption of an IPM approach for invasive species management will certainly help minimize harm to the environment, to human health, and to wildlife. See Registration page to register online.

* See our Education for Professionals - General Course Information section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 08, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Japanese barberry was introduced as an ornamental and promoted as a replacement for common barberry (Berberis vulgaris), which is a host for black stem rust. Japanese barberry forms dense stands that compete with native trees and herbaceous plants.

* See our Plants section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jan 08, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Karnal bunt is a fungal disease that infects wheat, reducing quality and yield. Karnal bunt was first detected in the U.S. in 1996, possibly arrived from Mexico in shipments of contaminated grain.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jan 08, 2013


Invasive Plants Association of Wisconsin. (IPAW)

One of the basic principles of invasive plant management is early detection. To that end, IPAW is sponsoring a reward program to encourage and provide incentive for citizens of the state to look for and report prohibited invasive plants.

* See our Wisconsin state resource page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 07, 2013


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