Microbes

Use our Custom Search Engine to search for invasive species information included in the What's New section of NISIC's site:


U.S. Department of Agriculture.

More than $1.5 million in funding has been allocated to expand bio-control efforts to fight Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening. This action is the first designation of funds by the Huanglongbing Multi-Agency Response to Devastating Citrus Disease since it was established by Secretary Vilsack in Dec 2013.

* See our Species Profile - Citrus Greening page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 15, 2014


USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

U.S. Forest Service researchers have identified what may be a key to unraveling some of the mysteries of White Nose Syndrome (WNS): the closest known non-disease causing relatives of the fungus that causes WNS. These fungi, many of them still without formal Latin names, live in bat hibernation sites and even directly on bats, but they do not cause the devastating disease that has killed millions of bats in the eastern U.S. Researchers hope to use these fungi to understand why one fungus can be deadly to bats while its close relatives are benign.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 08, 2013


USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

Citrus greening disease, also known as Huanglongbing, is the most serious threat to the Florida citrus industry in its history. It's costing the industry millions in losses each year, and there is no known cure for HLB and no commercially viable, effective treatments. USDAscientists have found that heating potted citrus seedlings in growth chambers can rid seedlings of HLB symptoms.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 08, 2013


Thousand Cankers Disease Survey Guidelines Now Available (May 2013)

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

In cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine has updated the Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) Survey Guidelines for 2013 (Mar 2013; PDF | 4.5 MB). TCD results from the combined activity of Geosmithia morbida fungus and the walnut twig beetle (WTB, Pityophthorus juglandis).

* See our Thousand Cankers Disease page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 06, 2013