Animals

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Use our Custom Search Engine to search for invasive species information included in the What's New section of NISIC's site:


Ohio Department of Agriculture.

In an effort to protect the trees of Ohio, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is encouraging Ohio citizens to check their trees for signs of the Walnut Twig Beetle and Asian Longhorned Beetle. The Walnut Twig Beetle is a small beetle known to carry a fungus that causes Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD), which can kill walnut trees. Walnut Twig Beetle was first confirmed in Ohio in late 2012 in traps set by Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry officials in Butler County. Additionally, scientists from the Ohio Plant Diagnostic Network, a cooperative partnership between ODA and The Ohio State University, recently isolated the TCD fungus from walnut branch samples from the Butler County area, marking the first time TCD has been confirmed in Ohio.

* See our Ohio state resource page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 17, 2014


State of Hawai'i Department of Agriculture.

Another new invasive pest has been detected on Oahu, one that damages coconut trees and other palm plants. The Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle (CRB) was detected at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam on Dec 23, 2013 during routine surveys conducted.

* See our Hawaii state resource page for additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 16, 2014


Massachusetts Introduced Pest Outreach Project.

The emerald ash borer (EAB) was detected in the western Massachusetts Town of Dalton on Aug 31, 2012, and was confirmed by federal officials on Sep 6, 2012. Massachusetts is the 18th state in the country to detect EAB. See latest news to keep up with the latest Massachusetts pest news. If you think you have seen EAB or signs of EAB tree damage in Massachusetts, use the Emerald Ash Borer Reporting Form. Also see how you can help detect EAB -- wasp watchers wanted!

* See our Massachusetts state resource page for additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 14, 2014


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Khapra beetles are native to India. The first specimen in the U.S. was discovered in California in 1953, but the infestation was eradicated; since then, it has been frequently intercepted on imported cargo. These invasive insects are a destructive pest of grain products and seeds.

* See our Animals section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Sep 26, 2013