Species Profiles

Use our Custom Search Engine to search for invasive species information included in the What's New section of NISIC's site:


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Khapra beetles are native to India. The first specimen in the U.S. was discovered in California in 1953, but the infestation was eradicated; since then, it has been frequently intercepted on imported cargo. These invasive insects are a destructive pest of grain products and seeds.

* See our Animals section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Sep 26, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Oriental fruit flies were first recorded in Taiwan and were introduced to Hawaii in the 1940s. Several infestations in the continental U.S. have been discovered since then, but all have been eradicated. This species is a destructive pest of fruits and vegetables.

* See our Animals section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Aug 14, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

European grapevine moths are native to Italy. The first specimen in the U.S. was recorded in Napa County, California in 2009. These invasive moths feed on grapevine flowers and berries, and can cause serious damage to vineyards.

* See our Animals section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jul 09, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Kudzu bugs are native to Asia and were detected for the first time in the U.S. in Georgia in 2009. Kudzu bugs damage soybeans and other legume crops.

* See our Animals section for more information and additional species profiles.additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 13, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Golden bamboo was introduced as an ornamental and forms dense monospecific stands that displace native species. When golden bamboo takes over an area, it is very difficult to control.

* See our Plants section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Apr 08, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Sacred Bamboo was introduced as an ornamental. It colonizes by spreading underground root sprouts and by animal-dispersed seeds, and may displace native species. It is difficult to remove manually because even the smallest piece of rootwill re-sprout.

* See our Plants section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Apr 08, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Channeled apple snail was imported for aquaculture and the aquarium trade and was introduced to Hawaii in 1989. Channeled apple snail damages rice and taro production by feeding on seedlings and competes with native apple snails and other species.

* See our Aquatic Species section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Mar 20, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Japanese barberry was introduced as an ornamental and promoted as a replacement for common barberry (Berberis vulgaris), which is a host for black stem rust. Japanese barberry forms dense stands that compete with native trees and herbaceous plants.

* See our Plants section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jan 08, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Karnal bunt is a fungal disease that infects wheat, reducing quality and yield. Karnal bunt was first detected in the U.S. in 1996, possibly arrived from Mexico in shipments of contaminated grain.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jan 08, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Common buckthorn is an invasive plant introduced to the U.S. in the early 1800s (or possibly earlier) as an ornamental plant. Common buckthorn forms dense stands that dominate ecosystems and displace native species.

* See our Plants section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 12, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Butternut Canker is a lethal disease which is killing butternut trees throughout its range in North America. The disease was first detected in the U.S.. in 1967, but may have been present before then. The wood from butternut trees is valued for furniture, paneling, specialty products, and carving. Butternut produces nuts for wildlife and is important for commercial nut production.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 05, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Chestnut Blight is a fungal disease that virtually eliminated mature American chestnuts from the U.S. The disease was introduced on nursery stock imported from Asia and was first discovered in 1904.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 05, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Beech bar disease is a fungal disease that kills American beech trees after being attacked by the beech scale insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga). The disease was Introduced accidentally on imported European beech saplings and was introduced to Canada during the late 1800s and first appeared in the U.S. during the 1930s.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 04, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Burmese pythons are native to Southeast Asia and were imported to the U.S. for the pet trade. Wild populations became established in 2000 in Florida from animals that escaped or were intentionally released. Burmese pythons prey on native species and may also compete with threatened native species.

* See our Animals section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 04, 2012