Microbes

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USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

U.S. Forest Service researchers have identified what may be a key to unraveling some of the mysteries of White Nose Syndrome (WNS): the closest known non-disease causing relatives of the fungus that causes WNS. These fungi, many of them still without formal Latin names, live in bat hibernation sites and even directly on bats, but they do not cause the devastating disease that has killed millions of bats in the eastern U.S. Researchers hope to use these fungi to understand why one fungus can be deadly to bats while its close relatives are benign.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 08, 2013


USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

Citrus greening disease, also known as Huanglongbing, is the most serious threat to the Florida citrus industry in its history. It's costing the industry millions in losses each year, and there is no known cure for HLB and no commercially viable, effective treatments. USDAscientists have found that heating potted citrus seedlings in growth chambers can rid seedlings of HLB symptoms.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Aug 08, 2013


Thousand Cankers Disease Survey Guidelines Now Available (May 2013)

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

In cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine has updated the Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) Survey Guidelines for 2013 (Mar 2013; PDF | 4.5 MB). TCD results from the combined activity of Geosmithia morbida fungus and the walnut twig beetle (WTB, Pityophthorus juglandis).

* See our Thousand Cankers Disease page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 06, 2013


USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

USDAscientists have developed a new cell line that rapidly and accurately detects foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) which causes a highly contagious and economically devastating disease in cattle and other cloven-hoofed animals. "This important breakthrough is an example of how ARSscientists are working to improve agricultural productivity in the face of increasing demand for food," said ARSAdministrator Edward B. Knipling. "This new cell line will help in the global effort to control a disease that can cause significant economic losses."

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: May 28, 2013


USDA. Blog.

Oranges that don't turn orange on the tree when they’re supposed to might be victims of a disease called "citrus greening," also known as Huanglongbing, or HLB. Citrus greening is especially devastating because it makes the juice bitter, so the fruit isn’t even suitable for juicing, let alone the fresh market. But Agricultural Research Service scientists have found that the same bitter juice that causes despair among growers could yield invaluable clues to how the disease works -- and how to stop it.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Mar 19, 2013


DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

White-nose syndrome (WNS) which is the disease that has killed millions of bats in the eastern U.S. has been confirmed for the first time in Georgia. White-nose syndrome has been recently confirmed in South Carolina and Illinois.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Mar 19, 2013


USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

USDA scientists are helping citrus growers and juice processors address the threat posed by Huanglongbing (HLB), a disease that is costing the citrus industry millions of dollars each year.

* See our In the News section for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Feb 12, 2013


The James Hutton Institute (United Kingdom).

A study by scientists has warned the organism responsible for the Irish potato famine is still a major threat. The team said the results showed the need for strategies to protect potatoes from disease. Phytophtora infestans is a fungus like organism that causes late blight in potatoes. It infects leaves, stems and tubers and can cause devastating crop losses.

* See our Species Profile - Late Blight page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jan 15, 2013


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Karnal bunt is a fungal disease that infects wheat, reducing quality and yield. Karnal bunt was first detected in the U.S. in 1996, possibly arrived from Mexico in shipments of contaminated grain.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jan 08, 2013


Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

Iowa tree and bug experts are looking for the presence of a beetle that could cause problems with Iowa's valuable black walnut industry. Thousand cankers disease is specific to walnuts and has been confirmed in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, and Washington in the 1990s. Recently, the disease has been confirmed in Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Virginia. It has not been found in Iowa. The disease is introduced into a tree by the walnut twig beetle that carries a fungus on its body. The plant pathogen is spread under the bark of walnut trees when the beetle creates its extensive galleries.

* See our Iowa state resource page for more information and additional resources.

 
Post Date: Jun 29, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Butternut Canker is a lethal disease which is killing butternut trees throughout its range in North America. The disease was first detected in the U.S.. in 1967, but may have been present before then. The wood from butternut trees is valued for furniture, paneling, specialty products, and carving. Butternut produces nuts for wildlife and is important for commercial nut production.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 05, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Chestnut Blight is a fungal disease that virtually eliminated mature American chestnuts from the U.S. The disease was introduced on nursery stock imported from Asia and was first discovered in 1904.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 05, 2012


USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Beech bar disease is a fungal disease that kills American beech trees after being attacked by the beech scale insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga). The disease was Introduced accidentally on imported European beech saplings and was introduced to Canada during the late 1800s and first appeared in the U.S. during the 1930s.

* See our Microbes section for more information and additional species profiles.

 
Post Date: Jun 04, 2012